Books

A selection of books I've read and recommend.
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NameAuthorShort Description
Brief History of Nearly Everything Bill Bryson An engaging book about... nearly everything... in science. :) At times a bit slow, but worth reading. 
Brief History of Time Stephen Hawking  Required reading if you are serious about science... 
Dragons of Eden Carl Sagan A very good historical review of the development of the brain in the species leading up to the human brain. A bit outdated now, but certainly worth reading as a first approach to the topic. 
Gödel, Escher, Bach, An Eternal Golden Braid Douglas Hofstadter A discussion on how life can spring from inanimate objects and consciousness arises from simple systems, drawing analogies and complex loops and networks with physics, biology, art, music and mathematics. Advanced reading, but necessary... definitely. One of the best books I've read 
At Home in the Universe Stuart Kauffman A great summary of the work done by the author at the Santa Fe Institute on the emergence of complexity and self-organization from a very simple set of rules, using chaos theory and physics of complex systems. An illuminating work. 
The Origin of Species Charles Darwin The full title is On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection, or the Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life. A classic, tough to read at points, highly detailed, and thoroughly documented (See also "The Voyage of the Beagle", by the same author). A groundbreaking, revolutionary work that sets the basis for Evolution and Natural Selection. 
Darwin's Dangerous Idea Daniel C. Dennet A case for Natural Selection as a universal algorithm, and for ultra-darwinism. Relates deeply to ideas of self organization and complexity as described by Stuart Kauffman in "At Home in the Universe". 
The Selfish Gene Richard Dawkins A description of how evolution and natural selection acts on individual genes, and how we, humans, are nothing but a host to the genes' objective of self-replication. Thought provoking and challenging, while deeply engaging. 
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